Last edited by Muk
Sunday, July 12, 2020 | History

2 edition of Archbishop Grindal and his grammar school of Saint Bees. found in the catalog.

Archbishop Grindal and his grammar school of Saint Bees.

William Jackson

Archbishop Grindal and his grammar school of Saint Bees.

by William Jackson

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Published by Bemrose in London, (etc) .
Written in English


Edition Notes

ContributionsSaint Bees. School.
The Physical Object
Pagination81 p. :
Number of Pages81
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21443181M

The font cover is the gift of the late Captain Fitchet. The communion-plate appears to have been pre- sented by the benevolent archbishop whose memory is 80 intimately connected with the place as the founder of the Free Grammar School. It bears the date , and the arms of the archiepiscopal see of York impaled with those of   25 July – The Free Grammar School of Queen Elizabeth of the Parishioners of the Parish of Saint Olave in the County of Surrey is established in Tooley Street, London. 29 August – Ridolfi plot discovered. On 7 September Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk, is arrested for his

The Three Hierarchs teach us to do these three things. One: to gather knowledge, culture, and wisdom from everywhere, and to be generous with these gifts in return. Two: to build our lives with these precious gifts, as if we were building our own house to share with others, just as bees share the hive. And three: to use the things of this world to glorify God, just as we make candles out of ?inheritRedirect=true. Search the history of over billion web pages on the ://

Thomas Becket (; also known as Saint Thomas of Canterbury, Thomas of London, and later Thomas à Becket; 21 December c. (or ) – 29 December ) was Archbishop of Canterbury from until his murder in He is venerated as a saint and martyr by both the Catholic Church and the Anglican engaged in conflict with Henry II of England over the rights and privileges of   SANDYS, EDWIN (?–), archbishop of York, was born probably at Hawkshead in Furness Fells, Lancashire, in Strype, in his life of Parker (i. ), says that he was a Lancashire man (of a stock settled at St. Bees), and that he was forty-three when consecrated bishop of Worcester in , the former statement supporting that of Baines (Lancashire, v. ), who also names ,_Edwin_(?)_(DNB00).


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Archbishop Grindal and his grammar school of Saint Bees by William Jackson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Archbishop Grindal’s birthplace Cross Hill, St Bees, Cumbria By John and Mary Todd “the house wherein I was born, and the lands pertaining thereto, being a small matter, under twenty shillings rent, but well builded at the charges of my father and brother.” (1) So wrote Edmund Grindal, on the point of promotion from bishop of London The most enduring monument to Grindal has proved to be the “free grammar school” which he founded in his native village of St Bees, where he had not been for perhaps forty-five years.

The school was to be built and at a cost of £s.4d. and endowed with annual revenues of £   Edmund Grindal, (born ?, St.

Bees, Cumberland, Eng.—died July 6,Croyden, Surrey), English archbishop of Canterbury whose Puritan sympathies brought him into serious conflict with Queen Elizabeth I.

Educated at Magdalene and Christ’s colleges, Cambridge, he became a royal chaplain and prebendary of Westminster in and, during the reign of Mary I, went to the Continent   Edmund Grindal, archbishop, was born here in ; he was translated to the see of York from London, and afterwards to Canterbury, where he was for some time suspended by Elizabeth.

He founded St. Bees grammar school, died July 6 th,and was buried in the parish church of   St. Bees Grammar School was founded inby Edmund Grindal, Archbishop of Canterbury, under a charter from Queen Elizabeth. The school was formerly known as the Free Grammar School; but all the provisions of the original charter have been abrogated, and new constitutions drawn up in conformity with the Endowed Schools Act of, and   He even considered resigning as Archbishop, but died, a before all the procedures for such an action could be completed.

His successor as Archbishop was John Whitgift. The most endearing monument to Edmund Grindal was the “free grammar school” he set up in his native St Bees in The school was built at a cost of £ 6s :// The School owes its existence to Edmund Grindal, Archbishop of York ( ) and of Canterbury ( – ); he was born in the village about of yeoman farmer stock.

Called the “Free Grammar School”, the School was to provide education for boys born in Cumberland and Westmorland, who were able to pass an educational :// The free school of St. Bees was incorporated by Queen Elizabeth in the name of Edmund Grindall, Archbishop of Canterbury, and the school and master's house were built by his executors.

The founder's donation was fifty pounds a year, twenty pounds whereof he appointed to be paid to the master of Pembroke Hall, :// The History of St.

Bees School encompasses more than four hundred years of British history. It was founded in as a Free Grammar School by the dying Archbishop of Canterbury, Edmund Grindal, who refused to resign his position until Queen Elizabeth I agreed to sign the school into existence.

After extremely modest beginnings, the school gradually expanded over the years despite its remote +of+st+bees+school/en-en.

Edwin Sandys (/ ˈ s æ n d z /; – 10 July ) was an English prelate. He was Anglican Bishop of Worcester (–), London (–) and Archbishop of York (–) during the reign of Elizabeth I of :// ARCHBISHOP LAUD AND HIS TIMES.

William Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury, was beheaded on Tower Hill, London, in the year He was one of five Archbishops in historical times who died violent deaths.

Alphege was killed by the Danes inin Ethelred's ://   Thomas Cranmer (2 July – 21 March ) was a leader of the English Reformation and Archbishop of Canterbury during the reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI and, for a short time, Mary helped build the case for the annulment of Henry's marriage to Catherine of Aragon, which was one of the causes of the separation of the English Church from union with the Holy ://   St Bees School is a co-educational independent school located in the West Cumbrian village of St Bees, England which caters for day, full, weekly or flexi-boarders.

Founded in by the then Archbishop of Canterbury Edmund Grindal as a boys' "free grammar school", it later became a member of the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference and Genealogy profile for Edwin Sandys, Archbishop of York.

Archbishop Edwin Sandys (–) was an English prelate. He was Anglican Bishop of Worcester (–), London (–) and Archbishop of York (–) during the reign of Elizabeth I of ://   GRINDAL, EDMUND (?–), archbishop of Canterbury, was the son of William Grindal, a well-to-do farmer who lived at Hensingham, in the parish of St.

Bees, Cumberland, a district which Grindal himself described as 'the ignorantest part in religion, and most oppressed of covetous landlords of anyone part of this realm' (Remains, p.

).,_Edmund_(DNB00). Books at Amazon. The Books homepage helps you explore Earth's Biggest Bookstore without ever leaving the comfort of your couch.

Here you'll find current best sellers in books, new releases in books, deals in books, Kindle eBooks, Audible audiobooks, and so much ://   Isidore of Seville (/ ˈ ɪ z ɪ d ɔːr /; Latin: Isidorus Hispalensis; c. – 4 April ), was a scholar and, for over three decades, Archbishop of is widely regarded, in the oft-quoted words of the 19th-century historian Montalembert, as "the last scholar of the ancient world." Bishop Ridley's letters to various Christian brethren in bonds in all parts, and his disputations with the mitred enemies of Christ, alike proved the clearness of his head and the integrity of his heart.

In a letter to Mr. Grindal, (afterward archbishop of Canterbury,) he mentions with affection those who had preceded him in dying for the faith   Edmund Grindall, who became Archbishop of Canterbury inobtained from Queen Elizabeth permission to found a free grammar school at St.

Bees in today it remains essentially the public school for Cumberland although no longer free. Obviously this is not the same Archbishop Grindal mentioned in my letter of. On April 4,Saint Isidore of Seville, Archbishop of Seville, passed is referred to as “the last scholar of the ancient world.

In his encyclopaedia Etymologiarum sive originum libri XX he compiled the knowledge of antiquity still existing in the west of the Mediterranean aroundcombined it with patristics and made it available to his.

His name was included in the new commission for ecclesiastical causes of (Life of Grindal, p. ). When Parker was at the point of death in MayNowell wrote to Burghley recommending Grindal, then archbishop of York, for the see of ,_Alexander_(DNB00).An illustration of an open book.

Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video. An illustration of an audio speaker. Audio. An illustration of a " floppy disk. Software. An illustration of two photographs. Full text of "The remains of Edmund Grindal"EDMUND GRINDAL (c.

), successively bishop of London, archbishop of York and archbishop of Canterbury, born aboutwas son of William Grindal, a farmer of Hensingham, in the parish of St Bees, ://